neolithic

Survey on Arran

Archaeological measured survey of chambered tombs on Scotland’s national forest estate on Arran

Forestry Commission Scotland (FCS) is committed to undertaking conservation management, condition monitoring and archaeological recording at our significant historic assets; and to helping to develop, share and promote best-practice historic environment conservation management. We are proud to support Our Place in Time: the Historic Environment Strategy for Scotland and the emerging Scottish Archaeology Strategy; and often seek to contribute to the Scottish Archaeological Research Framework.

Three archaeological companies were asked to survey broadly the same range of sites. Each had proposed a different approach to survey and record:

•     Terrestrial Laser Scanning with complementary capture of archaeological interpretation by GPS Rover (AOC Archaeology). The report is available here;

•     Terrestrial Laser Scanning with complementary Terrestrial Photogrammetry [allowing detailed colour texture mapping of point clouds] (Northlight Heritage). The report is available here; and

•     Simple Terrestrial and Aerial Photogrammetry [using drone] with metric control by GPS Rover (Archaeological Survey & Consulting). The report is available here.

 

Comparative plans of all of the chambered tombs on Scotland’s national forest estate that were surveyed as part of this project

The comparative plans of all of the chambered tombs on Scotland’s national forest estate that were surveyed as part of this project.

 

Views of Neolithic Arran

Archaeology is a very visual activity and almost always involves photography, measured survey and informed illustration. Good archaeological visualisation helps to consolidate understanding by encouraging the active participation of the audience. It supports effective archaeological analysis and can greatly enhance the historic environment record. By blending integrated archaeological measured survey with an aesthetic illustrative ethos we can achieve both objective measured record and subjective interpretation.

The priority targets of any programme of archaeological measured survey and visualisation should include:

•     significant archaeological monuments;

•     monuments at risk;

•     eroding / collapsing drystone monuments; and

•     early carved stones facing accelerated erosion.

The benefits and objectives of archaeological measured survey and visualisation include:

•     an enhanced archaeological record;

•     a creative response that is both functional and aesthetic;

•     the collection of baseline information that informs conservation management and allows detailed condition  monitoring; 

•     to encourage professional CPD and broaden fieldwork objectives (where possible); 

•     to visibly demonstrate and confirm the importance of a site; and

•     to enhance the presentation of both methodology and archaeology.

Visualisation of the anatomy of a chambered tomb

This innovative exploded visualisation of the anatomy of a chambered tomb (by AOC Archaeology) can be used to explain and promote understanding.